Book Reviews from the Field: Psychologist, Psych Nurses

Thanks to Psych Central for adding Ben Behind His Voices to the excellent titles in their Mental Health Library. I’m proud to be listed here!

Readers who also happen to be healthcare providers (psychiatrists, nurses, psychologists, social workers, etc.) give extra hope that the messages in our story (greater empathy, the human face of mental illness, reduction of stigma, need for early detection, more integrated treatment options, new research, increased services, open communication and teamwork in recovery) will continue to branch out to others. Thank you!

From Nicholette Leanza, M.Ed, PCC-S – review on Psych Central

Ben Behind His Voices is an inspirational story about a family’s experience with schizophrenia… This book is a good resource for individuals with schizophrenia and their families. It also serves as a strong reminder to mental health professionals to treat individuals affected with the illness with dignity and compassion…

She carries the reader along and we, in turn, can feel her pain to find the answers to her son’s issues and problems. She begins some of her chapters with excerpts from Ben’s writings, which provide the reader some insight into his perspective on his struggles:

I am most of my voices

Many different selves

I don’t need to give in to what I fear

Just give in to the fact that I’m afraid.

~ Ben, c. 2001″

 

Here, Psychiatric Nurse Charmaine Grace shares her perspective on her blogpost “I Love My Job”

“This book is a must-read for anyone working in the mental health field, a family member of someone suffering from a mental illness, or any person who is diagnosed. One very important lesson I learned from this book is that there is so much more to that person behind the hospital room door than a simple diagnosis.

Now, whenever I see a patient, I try to recall this memoir and think about the process of how this person got into a crisis, how afraid he or she may have been, and how afraid his or her family may have been. When I see a family member, I always try to remember to ask, “How are you feeling?” to let him or her know that this is not an easy process, and that his or her health (physical and psychological) is very important to me.”

Thanks to you both for reading the book, sharing your thoughts, and for your work in this field.

 

She carries the reader along and we, in turn, can feel her pain to find the answers to her son’s issues and problems. She begins some of her chapters with excerpts from Ben’s writings, which provide the reader some insight into his perspective on his struggles: 

I am most of my voices

Many different selves

I don’t need to give in to what I fear

Just give in to the fact that I’m afraid.

~ Ben, c. 2001

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